Quaid’s 11 August (1947) Address Be made Substantive Part of the Constitution

Since long, a controversy has been raging as to what kind of state Quaid-i-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah wanted Pakistan to be: a religious state or a secular state. Fortunately, that controversy precludes certain extremes, for instance, it is generally understood and admitted that Quaid never wanted Pakistan to be a theocratic or a socialist state. That amounts to saying that the controversy focuses mainly on whether it was an “Islamic” state or a “secular” state that Quaid may have envisioned.

That controversy has its roots in what Quaid himself said, that is, the speeches and addresses he delivered on various …

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Stray reflections on the 68th Independence Day

Note: This article was completed on August 4, 2014. Since then little has changed; this piece is still relevant on this 68th Independence Day. 
Stray reflections on the 67th Independence Day
For the sane in Pakistan the fight is about protecting the values, the humanity has developed in the course of thousands of years, from the political and religio-political witchcraft, which it is intent upon destroying thoughtlessly. How the time-tested values were trashed (and are being trampled even this moment) when Pakistan came into being is a saga of ruthless fights between

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Prosperity is here in Pakistan, Mr. PM!

Countries may be likened to individuals who are resourceless and in order to grow and progress need help from their near ones, dear ones or they borrow from a professional lender. That may be understood as the reality of setting-up a business for which capital is a sine qua non. Such attempts of likening countries with individuals appear quite promising, but are paradoxical. The case of Warren Buffet may be used, for instance, for Pakistan to follow. Is it so? Or it tears apart the likeness between both?
In the first place,

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Aristocratization / Bureaucratization of Adabi Baithak (ادبی بیٹھک), Lahore

Years back, when the very well-know Pak Tea House was closed down, a small portion of the Hall III, Al-Hamra, The Mall, Lahore, was made into a place exclusively for the littérateur to sit, chat, and take a cup of tea. It was known as Adabi Baithak (ادبی بیٹھک).
 
It’s important to note here that there is a “canteen” also inside the premise of Al-Hamra, outside of which in the open space visitors and especially students of music, and artists used to sit and enjoy a cup of tea.

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